Headlines > News > M1: The Crab Nebula from Hubble

M1: The Crab Nebula from Hubble

Published by Klaus Schmidt on Sun Sep 9, 2018 10:14 am via: NASA
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This is the mess that is left when a star explodes. The Crab Nebula, the result of a supernova seen in 1054 AD, is filled with mysterious filaments. The filaments are not only tremendously complex, but appear to have less mass than expelled in the original supernova and a higher speed than expected from a free explosion. The featured image, taken by the Hubble Space Telescope, is presented in three colors chosen for scientific interest.

The Crab Nebula spans about 10 light-years. In the nebula’s very center lies a pulsar: a neutron star as massive as the Sun but with only the size of a small town. The Crab Pulsar rotates about 30 times each second.

Image Credit: NASA, ESA, Hubble, J. Hester, A. Loll (ASU)

Image Credit: NASA, ESA, Hubble, J. Hester, A. Loll (ASU)

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